Matariki and Navigation - Kupe, Cook and Today

The 2019 sestercentennial commemoration of Captain Cook's first visit, called Tuia 250 First Encounters, is a time to reflect on the skills and knowledge of the people who discovered and founded Aotearoa New Zealand.
Matariki was originally a solar celebration that marked the solstice and let people commemorate dead and think about new year. Matariki means the eye of the Ariki, as the small star cluster rises just before dawn in early June from the same point that the Sun rises on the north-eastern horizon. This heralds the Māori New Year: a perfect time for our journey of discovery to explore the significance of Matariki; to appreciate the importance of stars in early navigation; to paddle a traditional waka; to explore Cook's landing sites; to use 18th century navigation and charting techniques, and to see how they compare with modern marine navigation and charting.

Kererū Count - kaitiakitanga in action

Did you know that kererū (native wood pigeon) are essential to New Zealand's native biodiversity? They are the only birds that can disperse big seeds of many of our native trees like miro, tawa, taraire, and nīkau which enables them to survive. So kererū have an important role to play in sustainability. Although the disappearance of these birds could be a disaster for the regeneration of our native forests, on this field trip you will find plenty of good news stories of people working effectively to increase the population of kererū.

This field trip is also supported by The Tindall Foundation.

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Where are we? - navigating and positioning on sea, land and air.

We all need to know where in the world we are. People rely on knowing their exact location so they can plan and carry out daily activities. In the past you may have used a paper map to find out where you are, now you can use a smart phone. This technology is not only making life easier and safer, it is also changing the world!

During this field trip you will travel to Wellington to investigate the uses and impacts of location based-technology as you journey on land, sea and air. You will meet all sorts of people who work with clever location-based tools and discover more about possible careers in this growing industry.