Barney Whiterats by Glenn Colquhoun

Barney Whiterats was a famous swagman who spent nearly forty years travelling the roads of Southland and Canterbury. At the time – from the 1870s right through until the 1930s – there were a lot of swagmen in New Zealand. They walked from place to place, looking for work and a meal, and maybe a bed for the night.
This aspect of our history brings to mind the homeless people in our society today, and the different way other people treat them.

The Remarkable Reti by Kiwa Hammon and Duane Culshaw

A reti is a fishing device, used by Ngāti Pāhauwera to catch kahawai on the Mōhaka River. The iwi regard the reti as a taonga, and the article provides a great example of how traditions, along with stories and waiata, are handed down through the generations.

The Land Beneath Our Feet: Resource Kit

Understanding relationships exist between people and the environment. Discovering that all iwi have stories connected to the land. Teacher guide for learning about relationships between mana whenua and the land, and how people pass on culture and heritage.
Includes three fact sheets in te reo Māori.

Make your Own Museum: Resource Kit

Communicating symbolism, meaning and value using photographic conventions. Teacher guide for working with students to investigate how meaning is communicated and interpreted, understanding the signifigance of personal and national taonga.
Includes resources in te reo Māori.

Māori History site on Te Kete Ipurangi - English medium

This site is designed to provide access to materials that will assist in the implementation of Te Takanga o te Wā, Guidelines for Teachers Years 1–8. This site features the stories of iwi educators, secondary teachers and their students, sharing their experiences of teaching and learning Māori history.

Te Takanga o te Wā is not designed as a list of lessons or learning experiences. Rather it provides a framework to support teachers to teach Māori history with their students. The content and context that you choose for your class could focus on building quality and collaborative engagement with your local iwi and hapū. The stories and histories relating to your school’s geographic location will assist you to instill a deeper sense of personal identity and belonging for every student. This resource provides connections to frame that context:

  • Whakapapa

  • Tūrangawaewae

  • Mana motuhake

  • Kaitiakitanga

  • Whanaungatanga

Each one has a list of possible conceptual understandings and a key message linked to the levels 1 and 2 achievement objectives of The New Zealand Curriculum.

My Place, by Janice Marriott

Jeromie and Jelintha have come to a New Zealand city from rural Papua New Guinea. Ryan lives on a farm that his family has owned for generations. The MacLean family is travelling around the country in a camper van. And Ruiha lives in an outer suburb of Wellington but commutes to school in the city. This text explores what “home” means to all these people. It includes information about their daily routines and the challenges they face. Quotes from interviews pepper the report, and key ideas are highlighted visually.
(Teacher support materials only)

Explorers of the Sunrise, by Jeff Evans and Damon Salesa

Polynesians have traveled vast distances in canoes for more than three thousand years, resulting in many settlements across the Pacific. In “Explorers of the Sunrise”, the first article recounts a recent voyage from New Zealand to Rapanui and back, using traditional navigation methods. The second article describes Polynesian travel, from the earliest migrations to modern-day air travel.

New New Zealanders, by Adrienne Jansen

This article introduces readers to a family who have escaped war-torn countries in the Middle East and have now embraced the freedom and safety that New Zealand offers. However, settling as refugees has its own challenges. We learn about the reasons the Kaka family had to move from Iraq to Syria, on to Lebanon, and then to New Zealand.

Alvin and Me, by Chris Tse

Themes of culture, difference, Chinese NZers, race, relationships, respect, and identity. "A week before Alvin arrived, I got summoned to the principal’s office. I was a good kid. I never got into trouble. I was sure I’d done nothing wrong. But still, I couldn’t help worrying..."